2018 PAN Year in Review Trends and Themes: Underrepresented History Projects

Annually, the Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review recognizes outstanding public art projects that represent the most compelling work for the year from across the country and beyond. The projects are selected and presented by a jury of three professionals who represent different aspects of the public art field, including artists, admonitors, and other public art allies. New this year, the PAN Advisory Council curated the selected 49 selected projects for 2018 under five unique themes to broaden the exposure of the selected works on ARTSblog and social media, and to provide context to the works through national trends and themes that are impacting the field today.

Many of 2018’s selected public art projects addressed issues at the forefront of current political discourse — particularly, how history and culture has not represented race, gender, sexuality, and class with fairness. Politically and socially, the issues are playing out through the incoming U.S. House of Representatives and the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements, among others. The arts and culture field is not exempt from addressing these national challenges, as demonstrated in recent museum exhibitions focused on decolonization, through the debate on memorials and monuments, and with temporary and permanent public artworks. Of the 2018 selected PAN Year in Review projects, six uniquely addressed the issue of underrepresented histories. 

February 1st- 28th
Mark Price’s silkscreen printed collage exhibition ROI, Real-time Or Instead features new and recent silkscreen printed collage works from artist Mark Price.
Engaged with the silkscreen printing collage processes over the past ten years Price utilizes a self produced archive of printed imagery including optical patterns, found graphics, and gradient color fields that collage into rich and frenetic two dimensional compositions.

Rehearsing for Civic Dialogue

Few of us are taught how to do civic dialogue. How do we develop and improve our ability to facilitate groups made up of individuals with potentially vastly different life experiences, identities, vested interests, and communication styles? Here’s one answer: Theater. When we want to literally incorporate new skills in our work, we need a body-based practice that can allow us to explore the interplay of subject matter, emotional response, social identity, and physical bodies in a physical space. That is the theater of civic engagement. And the methods of theater are learning tools that can and should be central to the training of public officials and community leaders who shape our interactions in the public sphere. Drexel University is currently working to ensure that urban planners have the skill set to facilitate civic engagement, and its Masters of Science in Urban Strategy (MSUS) program has drawn on embodied and theater-based methods as a core training methodology.

Civic Practice: Coupling Government Purpose and Artists’ Imagination in the City of Philadelphia

From 2015 to 2017, the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy (OACCE) planned and implemented Civic Practice, a program exploring government-initiated artist-led work in the community. Civic Practice was co-led by myself and Art in City Hall Program Manager Tu Huynh. Working with then Creative Time Artistic Director Nato Thompson, Civic Practice began with the formation of a National Task Force that would come together with local government leaders, artists, and community leaders to learn about best practices and experiences regarding how government can be proactive in civic dialogue through the arts. In many ways, simply gathering this group of creatives and civic leaders in this type of facilitated discussion was a major breakthrough. Innovation and input came equally from artists and bureaucrats and led to many unexpected, but needed and wanted, conversations. 

Celebrate National Shop Local Artists Week 2018

Be part of the nationwide celebration December 2-8, 2018

Thursday, November 8, 2018

From December 2 to 8, 2018, the initiative encourages the creative field to join together in communities across the country to promote the sales of the work of local artists, and to promote to all consumers that art—including tickets to events and organization memberships—makes great holiday gifts.

The Transformative Power of Cross-sector Collaboration: A Story of the Lackawanna County ARTS Engage! Task Force

The ARTS Engage! Task Force was created in 2016, inspired by a successful youth arts program and with a mission to “improve the quality of life for Lackawanna County residents through access to and participation in artistic, creative, and cultural experiences.” The power of passionate, committed, and diverse people working together has the ability to transform communities, but meaningful cross-sector collaborations take time. The kind of knowledge trust, enthusiasm, and planning needed for sustainability cannot be achieved in a short time frame. But rather than think of this as daunting, we can see it as a chance to expand our world, meet new people, challenge our cognitive biases, and create innovative and integrative systems of change. There will be stressful days, things won’t always work, and there may even be conflict. But I have found the joy in this work, and the impact far outweighs the difficulties.

Americans for the Arts Introduces the Arts + Social Impact Explorer

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Today, Americans for the Arts unveiled the Arts + Social Impact Explorer, an interactive online tool that draws together more than 1,000 data points on how the arts impact and integrate into 26 different sectors ranging from education and innovation, to health and wellness, immigration, faith and environment. The tool provides quick top-line research, example projects, core research papers, and lists service and partner organizations doing this work, as well as provides printable PDF fact sheets to share with decisionmakers.

Americans Speak Out About the Arts in 2018: An In-Depth Look at Perceptions and Attitudes About the Arts in America

In a society struggling to find equity and social justice, Americans believe the arts improve the quality of our communities. How do we know? We asked. Americans Speak Out About the Arts in 2018 is the second in a series of national public opinion surveys conducted by Ipsos on behalf of Americans for the Arts. One of the largest ever conducted, it gauges the public perspective on (1) personal engagement in the arts as audience and creator, (2) support for arts education and government arts funding, (3) opinions on the personal and well-being benefits that come from engaging in the arts, and (4) how those personal benefits extend to the community. Here are some findings of the survey. 

Americans for the Arts Is Celebrating National Arts in Education Week September 9-15

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

National Arts in Education Week Logo
Category: 

Americans for the Arts today announced its celebration of National Arts in Education Week. During this week, the field of arts education joins together in communities across the nation to celebrate the transformative power of the arts in education. 

Celebrate NAtional Arts Education Week and the A+ Art Exhibition artists at a reception on September 13 from4:00-6:00 p.m. in Conversation Hall, City Hall Room 201.
About A+ Art:

The City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy (OACCE), in partnership with Blick Art Materials and the School District of Philadelphia’s Office of the Arts and Academic Enrichment, presents the 9th annual A+ Art student art exhibition at City Hall.  A+ Art samples some of the most accomplished art from Kindergarten to Grade 12 representing all 10 City Council Districts.

2nd Annual Small Works Sales Exhibition
November 6th- December 30th
A holiday art show and sale from some of the areas most talented artists.  A wide variety of affordable pieces under $450.00. Find a small gem for yourself or someone on the gift list!
Artists:
Rachael Bridge
Megan Buccere
Jennifer L. Manzella
Jason Goldberg
Mike Sgier
Don Shoffner
Christine Stoughton

Poisons and Antidotes
September 4th- October 28th
Artist reception- Friday, September 7th from 6 PM - 9 PM

Americans for the Arts Announces Annual Business Committee for the Arts Awards to Honor Exceptional Businesses and Leaders

Awardees to Be Honored on October 2 at Gala in New York City

Monday, August 20, 2018

Americans for the Arts today announced this year’s BCA 10: Best Businesses Partnering with the Arts in America honorees. Presented every year by the Business Committee for the Arts (BCA), a division of Americans for the Arts, the BCA 10 awards recognize 10 U.S. companies, a business leader, and an arts and business partnership for their exceptional commitment to the arts. The awards will be presented by Americans for the Arts on October 2, 2018, at a black-tie gala at The Central Park Boathouse in New York City. 

How to Make a Monument

In the fall of 2017, Mural Arts Philadelphia embarked on our biggest project ever: Monument Lab, a nine-week-long public art and history project challenging Philadelphians to join a citywide conversation about history, memory, and our collective future. Twenty dynamic contemporary artists, selected by curators Paul M. Farber and Ken Lum, created temporary monuments across the city, and four of them were selected as outstanding public art projects by Americans for the Arts’ Public Art Network Year in Review. Because these four artworks stem from the same project, it’s easy to draw lines between them. Monument Lab asked us to consider what a monument is, and who gets a say in history. All of the artists answered this question in different visual ways, but their common qualities are clear. All four pieces make clear what is missing, what has gone untold.

Papercutting by Casey Lynch and Jessi Brown
 
July 3rd - August 31st
Artist reception- Saturday, July 14th from 6 PM - 9 PM
 

National Arts Marketing Project Kicks Off Second Pennsylvania Cohort

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Americans for the Arts, the leading organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America, is pleased to announce the second cohort of the Arts Marketing and Audience Engagement in the 21st Century: Building the Capacity of Pennsylvania’s Cultural Sector, a new, five-year initiative to strengthen and advance the arts marketing and audience engagement skills of Pennsylvania-based arts and cultural professionals. 

Help, I’m Marketing and I Can’t Get Up

How many of us are walking a line at our jobs between being an arts marketer, or not? Nowadays it seems as if dual and blended roles are becoming increasingly the norm for all except the largest arts and cultural organizations.

What does hosting a birthday party for a hotel duck have to do with arts marketing?

Participating in a special marketing initiative for Pennsylvania arts administrators gave our organization the tools we needed to expand our reach and strengthen our storytelling strategies.

Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, Arts Marketing and Audience Engagement Initiative

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Focusing on the Western part of Pennsylvania, the second Cohort of this program will participate in an intensive two-year curriculum that provides all participants the opportunity to build new skills in arts marketing and audience engagement. Applications for the 2018-2020 program are open through April 27, 2018.

I can be anything, I can be me | March 17, 2018 – May 13, 2018
Woodmere Art Museum, 9201 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19118
(located at Bells Mill Road in Chestnut Hill)
Reception: Sunday, March 25, 2 PM – 4 PM
RSVP: Julia@theArtWell.org
View on Facebook

Stand Against Hate | April 6 – 13, 2018
The Common Room, 1509 North Front Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122
First Friday Exhibition Opening: April 6, 6 PM – 9 PM
Get Tickets (Free) / View on Facebook

2018 ARTWELL AWARDS /// April 19 at the National Museum of American Jewish History /// Thrive. Dream. Lead.

Preparing Your Organization and Your Donors for Shifts in the Charitable Tax Deduction

On January 1, the 2018 Tax Cuts & Jobs Act went into effect, a substantial change to the U.S. tax code which has the potential to negatively impact arts and culture nonprofit organizations in a variety of ways. One of the most significant impacts will come in changes related to the thresholds and amounts associated with the charitable tax deduction. This 100-year-old provision was designed to stimulate giving to charities and other organizations serving the public good by providing an opportunity to claim a deduction as a reduction in an individual’s tax burden. While the repercussions of the federal tax code changes are still emerging, and corresponding shifts in state-by-state tax policy may impact your situation, the notes that follow are an introductory primer. If you have questions about state-level implications, we recommend you reach out to your state comptroller or state association of nonprofits.

The International Sculpture Center (ISC) is seeking panel proposals for the 28th International Sculpture Conference in Philadelphia, PA. Over 300 sculpture enthusiasts from around the world will gather this October 25-28, 2018 for engaging panel discussions, peer networking, and exciting cultural events surrounding topics in contemporary sculpture.
 
Submissions must be 200 words and include a clear but brief statement of the panel objective. Panel topics include:
 
Body and Context
Reimaging Monuments – Old and New

Arts Advocacy Day Is Coming

Although years may really just be a number, in its 31 years, Arts Advocacy Day has seen six different U.S. presidents spanning both political parties. It’s witnessed sixteen different congressional sessions and eight different Speakers of the U.S. House. Through it all, every year, attendees hear that “the arts are bipARTtisan.” Because, no matter who’s in office, arts advocacy matters. Funding decisions are made every year. Who’s deciding this year may not be deciding next year. Who’s to remember what happened before? Who’s to know why it matters? Who’s to learn from each other? The answer is us. All of us. All of us together.

Advancing Arts Locally

While we all work to serve audiences that are growing in diversity, we cannot prescribe the art that might engage our audience without engaging in conversation. We must be ready to walk with them, to find out through relationship and exploration together what their expectations, needs, and wants are. And that’s how we truly build community through the arts.

Arts and Cultural Solidarity

For many artists, making art is a coping mechanism to find inner calm and some kind of understanding about a confusing, chaotic world. So how might art heal our world? How might the artist become the healer?

Play runs from October 26 - November 19 with Speaker Sundays

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